Creating cachable content using selectors

The major difference between between static object and dynamically created object is that the static ones can be stored in caches; their content they contain does not depend on user or login data, date or other parameters. They look the same on every request. So caching them is a good idea to move the load off the origin system and to accelerate the request-response cycle.

A dynamically created object is influenced by certain parameters (usually username/login, permissions, date/time, but there are countless other) and therefor their content may be different from request to request. These parameters are usually specified as query parameters and must not be cached (see the HTTP 1.1 specification in RFC 2616).

But sometimes it would be great, if we could combine these 2 approaches. For example you want to offer images in 3 resolutions: small (as a preview image e.g in folder view), big (full screen view) and original (the full resolution delivered by the picture-taking device). If you decide to deliver it as static object, it’s cachable. But you need then 3 names (one for each resolution), one for each resolution. Choosing this will blur the fact that these 3 images are the same and differ only in the fact of the image resolution. It creates 3 images instead having only one in 3 instances. Amore practical drawback is that you always have to precompute these 3 pictures and place them on a reachable location. Lazy generation is hard also.

If you choose the dynamic approach, the image would be available as one object for which the instance can be created dynamically. The drawback is here that it cannot be cached.

Day Communique has the feature (the guys of Day ported it also to Apache Sling) to use so-called selectors. They behave like the query parameters one used since the stoneage of the HTTP/HTML era. But they are not query parameters, but merely encoded in the static part of the URL. So the query part of the ULR (as of HTTP 1.1) is no longer needed.

So you can use the URLs /etc/medialib/trafficjam.preview.jpg, /etc/medialib/trafficjam.big.jpg and /etc/medialib/trafficjam.original.jpg to adress the image in the 3 required resolutions. If your dispatcher doesn’t find them in its cache, it will forward the request to your CQ, which can then scale the requested image on demand. Then the dispatcher can store the image and deliver it then from its cache. That’s a very simple and efficient way to make dynamic objects static and offload requests from your application servers.

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