Permission sensitive caching

In the last versions of the dispatcher (starting with the 4.0.1 release) Day added a very interesting feature to the dispatcher, which allows one to cache also content on dispatcher level which are not public.
Honwai Wong of the Day support team explained it very well on the TechSummit 2008. I was a bit suprised, but I even found it on slideshare (the first half of the presentation)
Honwai explains the benefits quite well. From my experience you can reduce the load on your CQ publishers (trading a request which requires the rendering of a whole page to to a request, which just checks the ACLs of a page).

If you want to use this feature, you have to make sure that for every group or user, who has to have a individual page, the dispatcher delivers the right one. Imagine you want the present the the logged-in users the latest company news, but not logged-in users shouldn’t get them. And only the managers get the link to the the latest financial data on the startpage. So you need a startpage for 3 different groups (not-logged-in users, logged-in users, managers), and the system should deliver it appropriatly. So having a single home.html isn’t enough, you need to distinguish.

The easiest way (and the Day-way ;-)) is to use a selector denoting the group the user belongs to. So home.group-logged_in.html or home.managers.html would be good. If no selector is given, we assume the user to be an anonymous user. You have to configure the linkchecker to rewrite all links to contain the correct selector. So if a user belongs to the logged_in group and requests the home.logged_in.html page, the dispatcher will ask the CQ ” the user has the following http header lines and is requesting the home.logged_in.html, is it ok?”. CQ then checks if the given http header lines do belong to a user of the group logged_in; because he is, it responses with “200 OK, just go on”. And then the dispatcher will deliver the cached file and there’s no need for the CQ to render the same page again and again. If the users doesn’t belong to that group, CQ will detect that and send a “403 Permission denied”, and the dispatcher forwards this answer then to the user. If a user is member of more than one group, having multiple “group-“selectors is perfectly valid.

Please note: I speak of groups, not of (individual) users. I don’t think that this feature is useful when each user requires a personalized page. The cache-hit ratio is pretty low (especially if you include often-changing content on it, e.g daily news or the content of an RSS feed) and the disk consumption would be huge. If a single page is 20k and you have a version cached for 1000 users, you have a disk usage of 20 MB for a single page! And don’t forget the performance impact of a directory filled up with thousands of files. If you want to personalize pages for users, caching is inappropriate. Of course the usual nasty hacks are applicable, like requesting the user-specific data via an AJAX-call and then modifying the page in the browser using Javascript.

Another note: Currently no documentation is available on the permission sensitive caching. Only the above linked presentation of Honwai Wong.

3 thoughts on “Permission sensitive caching

  1. Honwai Wong

    Hi Jörg,

    great article and thanks for the positive feedback on my presentation 🙂

    One thing I’d like to add: the complete Permission Sensitive Caching feature is split into 2 parts:
    1) the Dispatcher being able to send a auth-check HEAD request to CQ
    2) CQ on the other side answering to such a HEAD request

    The latter part is not yet available OOTB in the latest CQ5.2 release but is planned for the next. The good thing is that it is possible to configure a URL to which the Dispatcher is sending its HEAD request, passing along the initially requested page as request parameter. This allows for custom implementation on a project level if one decides to use it before it becomes an official part of the CQ5.x WCM product.

    Best regards from Basel,
    Honwai

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