4 problems in projects on performance tests

Last week I was in contact with a collague of mine who was interested in my experience on performance tests we do in AEM projects.  In the last 12 years I worked with a lot of customers and implemented smaller and larger sites, but all of them had at least one of the following problems.

 (1) Lack of time

In all project plans time is allocated for performance tests, and even resources are assigned to it. But due to many unexpected problems in the project there are delays, which are very hard to compensate when the golive or release date is set and already announced to or by senior management. You typically try to bring live the best you can, and steps as performance tests are typically reduced first in time. Sometimes you are able to do performance tests before the golive, and sometimes they are skipped and postponed after golive. But in case when timelines cannot be met the quality assurance and performance tests are typical candidates which are cut down first.

(2) Lack of KPIs

When you the chance to do performance tests, you need KPIs. Just testing random functions of your website is simply not sufficient if you don’t know if this function is used at all. You might test the functionality which the least important one and miss the important ones. If you don’t have KPIs you don’t know if your anticipated load is realistic or not. Are 500 concurrent users good enough or should it rather be 50’000? Or just 50?

(3) Lack of knowledge and tools

Conducting performance tests requires good tooling; starting from the right environment (hopefully comparable sizing to production, comparable code etc) to the right tool (no, you should not use curl or invent your own tool!) and an environment where you execute the load generators. Not to forget proper monitoring for the whole setup. You want to know if you provide enough CPU to your AEM instances, do you? So you should monitor it!.

I have seen projects, where all that was provided, even licenses for the tool Loadrunner (an enterprise grade tool to do performance tests), but in the end the project was not able to use it because noone knew how to define testcases and run them in Loadrunner. We had to fall back to other tooling or the project management dropped performance testing alltogether.

(4) Lack of feedback

You conducted performance tests, you defined KPIs and you were able to execute tests and get results out of them. You went live with it. Great!
But does the application behave as you predicted? Do you have the same good performance results in PROD as in your performance test environment? Having such feedback will help you to refine your performance test, challenging your KPIs and assumptions. Feedback helps you to improve the performance tests and get better confidence in the results.


If you haven’t encountered these issues in your project, you did a great job avoid them. Consider yourself as a performance test professional. Or part of a project addicted to good testing. Or you are so small that you were able to ignore performance tests at all. Or you just deploy small increments, that you can validate the performance of each increment in production and redeploy a fixed version if you get into a problem.

Have you experienced different issues? Please share them in the comments.

One thought on “4 problems in projects on performance tests

  1. Tjeu de Graaf

    Have the same experience with performance testing and the problems mentioned in this article. I also do think management frequently has the perception that performing those test will prevent/solve their performance issues directly (without business participation). I’m a big fan of a more agile approach: work together to define the KPI’s / scenario’s, discuss results together and probably define or optimize your scenario’s for a rerun.

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