Sling Context-Aware configuration (part 5): thoughts on a production layout

In the past blog posts of this series I outlined some of the capabilities of the Sling Context-Aware configuration. I was focussing on the demo aspect of it, and ignored aspects of it which are relevant when we talk about the use of it in an production environment.

(Note: There is not too much experience using Sling CA Config in wider production use. In this blog post I discuss these based on my experience with the product I gained in many projects; and I assume that it will work. If you have different experience with, I am interested to hear from them!)

For example I placed the configuration editor in /content/ca-config/en/configuration-page, while the configuration itself was located somewhere in /conf. Also the WCM.io editor can only edit the configuration for the context it is located in; that means, that your editor at /content/ca-config/configuration-page cannot modify the configuration applicable to the content context /content/ca-config/en, but you have to have a dedicated configuration editor located in that context.

Let’s stick with /conf in this blog post . Every code and every user which needs to consume configuration has to have read access to /conf; and to make inheritance working, you have to have read access to the configuration you are inheriting from as well. Generally spoken, you need to provide read access to a large part of /conf to all users. Which is typically not a problem.

But if you want to prevent access to certain parts of /conf but still be able to use them as part of Context Aware Configuration you have to trick a bit.
Imagine the case, that you want to store password data for certain backend system in CA-Config. You want to make them read- and writable only to the group which administers this backend access, but not for other users. But nevertheless all users should be able to use this backend service.

In that case the best way is to hide the access to the backend system in an OSGI service which utilizes a service-user to access these CA-Config resource in /conf. Whenever an user access this backend system, he will utilize this service and its service-user to read the configuration, and therefor this region of /conf can be locked down.

In the next blog post I want to show you another aspect of “making CA-Config production ready”: Publishing configuration.

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