Best practices for AEM unittests

Some time ago I already wrote some posts (1, 2, 3) about unit testing with AEM, especially in combination with SlingMocks / AEM Mocks.

In the last months I also spent quite some time in improving the unittests of ACS AEM Commons, mostly in the context of updating the Mockito framework from 1.9x to a more recent version (which is a pre-requisite to make the complete build working with Java 11). During that undertaking I reviewed a lot of unit tests which required adjustments; and I came across some patterns which I also find (often?) in AEM projects. I don’t think that these patterns are necessarily wrong, but they make tests hard to understand, hard to change and often these tests make production code overly complex.

I will list a few of these patterns, which I consider problematic. I won’t go that far and call them anti-patterns, but I will definitely look closely at every instance I come across.

Unittests don’t matter, only test coverage matters.
Sometimes I get the impression, that the quality of the tests don’t matter, but only the resulting test coverage (as indicated by the test coverage tools like jacoco). That paying attention to the code quality of the tests and investing time into refactoring tests is wasted time. I beg to differ.
Although unit tests are not deployed into a production environment, the usual quality measures should be applied to unit tests as well, because it makes them easier extensible and understandable. And the worst which can happen to production code is that a bugfix is not developed in a TDD (build a failing testcase first to prove your error is happening) way because it is to much work to extend the existing tests.

Mocking Sling Resources and/or JCR nodes
With the presence of AEM Mocks there should not be any need to manually mock Sling Resources and JCR nodes. It’s a lot of work to do that, especially if you compare it to load a JSON structure into an in-memory repository. Same with ResourceResolvers and JCR sessions. So don’t mock Sling resources and JCR nodes! That’s a case for AemMocks!

Using setters in services to set references
When you want to test services, the AEM Mock framework handles injections as well, you just need to use the default constructor of your service to instantiate it, and then pass it to the context.registerInjectActivate() method. If required create the referenced services before as mocks and register them as well. AemMocks comes with ways to test OSGI services and components in a very natural way (including activations and injection of references), so please use it.
There is no need to use setter methods for the service references in the production code just for this usecase!

If you are looking for an example how these suggestions can be implemented, you can have a look the example project I wrote last year.

Of course this list is far from being complete; if you have suggestions or more (anti-) patterns for unittests in the AEM area, please leave me a comment.

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