Writing integration tests for AEM (part 4)

In the last post I mentioned that the URL provided to our integration tests allows us to test our dispatcher rules as well, a kind of “unit testing” the dispatcher setup. That’s what we do now.

This is the German way of saying “Stop here if you don’t have the right user-agent^Wvehicle”
Photo by Julian Hochgesang on Unsplash

As a first step we need to create a new RequestValidationClient, because we need to customize the underlying HTTP client, so it does not automatically follow HTTP redirects; otherwise it would be impossible for us to test redirects. And while we are on it, we want to customize the user-agent header as well, so it’s easier to spot the requests we do during the ingration tests. The way to customize the underlying HTTP client is documented, but a bit clumsy. But besides that this RequestValidationClient is not different from the SlingClient it’s derived from. Maybe we change that later.

The actual integration tests are in PublishRedirectsIT. Here I use this RequestValidationClient to perform unauthenticated requests (as end-users typically do) against the publish instance. To illustrate the testing of the client, there are 3 tests:

  • In the testInitialRedirectAndHomepage method it is validated, that a request to “/” will result in a permanent redirect to /en/us.html. Additionally it is made sure that /us/en.html is actually present and returns a 200.
  • A second test is hitting /system/console, which must never be exposed to the internet.
  • A third test ensures, that the default get servlet is properly secured, so that the infamous “infinity” selector for the JSON extension is returning a 404.

With this approach it is possible to validate that that complete security checklist of the dispatcher is actually implemented and that all “invalid” urls are properly blocked.

Some remarks to the PublishRedirectIT implementation itself:

  • Also here the tests are a bit clumsier than they could be. First, because the recommended ways to perform a HTTP request always have a “expectedReturnCode” parameter, which is unfortunate because we want to perform this test ourself. For that reason I build a small workaround to accept all status codes. The testing clients should offer that natively though.
  • And secondly, I encountered problems with the authentication on the publish. And that’s the reason why the creation of the anonymousPublish is at is is.

But anyway, that’s a neat approach to validate that your dispatcher setup is properly done. And of course you could also use the JsoupClient to test a page on publish as well.

Some remarks if you want to execute these tests in your system: I adjusted the configuration of the “dispatcher” module of the repository as well, so you can easily use it together with the dispatcher docker image (check out this fantastic documentation).

That’s it for today, happy testing!

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